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The M156 engine found in the Mercedes-AMG models such as the C63 AMG, E63 AMG, and CLK63 AMG, is a V8 monster. Such a massive, powerful engine requires an incredible amount of airflow, and that is why Mercedes designed this engine with dual air intakes. With dual air intakes, that means dual element air filtration—meaning two engine air filters that need regular replacement. 

Replacing the dual air filters on the Mercedes M156 engine couldn't be any easier. Like most jobs on the M156, I wouldn't let the AMG badge scare you away, thinking that the jobs are more complex simply because of the nature of a hand-built engine. 

 

Mercedes-AMG models and years applicable:

  • 2007-2009 Mercedes-Benz CLK63 AMG
  • 2008-2010 Mercedes-Benz CL63 AMG
  • 2007-2011 Mercedes-Benz CLS63 AMG
  • 2008-2010 Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG
  • 2007-2011 Mercedes-Benz E63 AMG
  • 2008-2015 Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG
  • 2007-2011 Mercedes-Benz ML63 AMG
  • 2009-2012 Mercedes-Benz SL63 AMG
  • 2007 Mercedes-Benz R63 AMG
 

 

Symptoms of clogged engine air filters on a Mercedes M156 engine:

  • Clogged filter media
  • Reduced engine performance
  • Internal engine damage

The air filters are responsible for filtering a massive amount of incoming air on the M156 engine. Over time, these filters become clogged with debris, reducing the overall effectiveness. Also, when it's clogged, it reduces the amount of air that can pass through and into your engine to fuel combustion. In extreme cases, this can let debris through to your engine internals. If you filter the air that goes into your lungs, why wouldn't you want to filter the air that goes directly into your engine's combustion chambers? 

 

What will it cost to replace the air filters on a Mercedes M156 engine?

A set of new engine air filters for your Mercedes M156 only cost around $20. If you were go to a shop, you could easily see a bill of around $100 to replace these. Save yourself the money and do it yourself at home in your driveway or garage. Plus, when these filters become clogged with debris again (which they most definitely will), you can take advantage of our Lifetime Replacement Guarantee

 

How long will it take to replace the air filters on a Mercedes M156 engine?

This is pretty much the easiest maintenance task you can complete on your Mercedes M156 engine. It's only a few screws and clips before you can drop in your new filters. I would budget 15-20 minutes from start to finish.

 

Tools required to replace the air filters on a Mercedes M156 engine:

 

Parts required to replace the air filters on a Mercedes M156 engine:

 

Steps required to replace the air filters on a Mercedes M156 engine:

Step 1: Remove the trim plate from the engine

Mercedes M156 Engine Bay

First, locate the two air filters; they are within the two silver boxes with AMG logos on them.

Next, remove the front trim plate by pulling straight up, below the Mercedes-Benz logo.

Mercedes M156 Engine Trim Cover Removal

Unclip the trim plate in front of each air filter housing by pulling straight up.

Mercedes M156 Engine Trim Cover Removal

Mercedes M156 Engine Trim Cover Removal

The underside of the plate will look like this photo below.

Mercedes M156 Engine Trim Cover Underside

 

Step 2: Remove the airbox cover and replace the air filter

Remove the five (5) screws holding each airbox cover on with a T25 Torx driver.

Mercedes M156 Engine Airbox Cover Torx Screws

Lift each cover to reveal the air filter underneath.

Mercedes M156 Engine Airbox Cover Removal

Hold the cover open with one hand while sliding the air filter out with the other.

Mercedes M156 Engine Air Filter Removal

Now you can insert your new air filter into the air box on each side.

 

Step 3: Reverse the steps to replace airbox covers and trim

Everything goes back together the exact same way it came apart. You shouldn't have any issue reassembling the airboxes. 

With the engine air filters replaced, maximum airflow will be restored, allowing your massive Mercedes-AMG V8 to breathe as well as the factory intended. It's a great idea to check the lower airbox halves for bugs and debris every oil change, as the intakes have a tendency to suck in whatever comes near the grille.

If you have any questions about this process, feel free to leave them in the comments below. If you want to read more Mercedes DIYs, guides, news, and more, you can do so by visiting our Mercedes-Benz hub at mercedes.fcpeuro.com.

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Written by :
Alex Fiehl

Alex is FCP’s Blog Editor and a Desktop Engineer from Endwell, NY. He has over 9 years of experience working on a wide array of import makes, but has found his home with European cars. With a BMW and Volvo at home, the garage is always busy.


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