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The Porsche Cayenne is a do-it-all family-hauler for people who despise drab SUVs. It’s also the Porsche for those who need more room than a 911 or Boxster can provide—no matter what anyone says, it is a real Porsche. And as with most cars built by the German marque, it has the potential to last for decades and even hundreds of thousands of miles, so long as it’s properly maintained. That’s what we’re here to talk about, after all.

Changing the oil in your Porsche is nothing to be afraid of. What’s more, it can save you a massive amount of money over the life of your vehicle. Some dealers charge nearly $400 for the job that costs about a quarter of that if you DIY, so we’ve thrown together a few tips if you’re doing it for the first time.

 

What is the best type of oil for a Porsche Cayenne?

Porsche Cayenne LIQUI MOLY oil

You’ll want to use a relatively lightweight oil that cuts down on friction and is much easier for your engine to circulate, especially in cold temperatures. At FCP Euro, we hand-build every single kit that's on our site, so all you have to do is add the year, make, and model vehicle and we'll automatically show you the kits that are specific to your application. We recommend an oil manufacturer with a solid reputation, like LIQUI MOLY, rather than bottom-shelf budget oils. It'll help your engine live a longer, happier life because the science within the formulations actually works. 

2003-2010 Porsche Cayenne: 5W30 Synthetic

2011-2018 Porsche Cayenne: 5W40 Synthetic

2019-Present Porsche Cayenne: 0W40 Synthetic

 

How much does an oil change cost for a Porsche Cayenne?

As we mentioned earlier, taking your Cayenne to a Porsche dealer for oil changes can quickly add up, especially when you’re completing the maintenance every 5,000 or so miles as recommended. Take that route and you’ll spend hundreds of dollars each time, though a complete kit with all the necessary oil, gaskets, and screws costs $100 or less. Factor that in with about an hour of your time and you’ll see exactly how much you save by taking care of the job at home. Not to mention, an oil change is one of the easiest DIYs you can do on your car. We're constantly posting new tutorials to our blog and YouTube channel, so be sure to check both to see if there's an applicable one for your vehicle. 

 

How do you reset the oil service now indicator in a Porsche Cayenne?

Once you’ve found the right type of oil for your Cayenne and made sure to get the proper filters, plugs and gaskets, it’s time to take care of the job itself. It doesn’t take long, and there’s no waiting in a lobby with a handful of other people who like paying too much for minor services.

Follow the normal steps—remove the underbody protection, which typically requires a Torx bit, and go from there. Remove the oil pan’s drain plug and let the old oil flow into a drain pan. It’s then time to remove the oil filter cover drain plug along with the filter itself, emptying out all the contaminated fluid. Simply install the new filter, install and tighten the new drain plugs—preferably to spec—and add oil into a funnel that flows into the marked opening.

Now that you’ve completed your oil change, re-installing the underbody protection and taking the car off the lift or jackstands, it’s time to reset the “oil service now” indicator. In earlier models like the 2003-2010 Cayenne, this involves holding the odometer button while turning the key, though you don’t have to actually start the car. You should be prompted with a "Service Reset" option, which you select, returning your oil life meter to zero percent.

On later model Porsche Cayennes, 2011 and newer, resetting the "Service Now" light requires a scan tool such as the Autel MX808 or a laptop equipped with the Porsche Durametric software.

Regardless, this helps keep track of the miles you place on your car between oil changes and allows you proper planning time to order or buy the materials for your next change.

 

The Bottom Line

These tips apply to virtually every Porsche Cayenne, from V6 base models to V8-powered Turbo variants. Make sure you don’t skip any steps in the procedure and buy parts and supplies that will reward your car for its miles upon miles of service. Precision-built German cars require proper maintenance, and if they’re given that, they tend to last for a long, long time.

If you have any questions about what oil to use in your Porsche Cayenne, or the oil change process itself, leave them in the comments below. And if you want to read more Porsche guides, DIYs, news, and reviews, you can do so by visiting our Porsche hub at porsche.fcpeuro.com.

News, Deals, and DIY's for your car


Written by :
Caleb Jacobs

Caleb cut his teeth on European cars with a '93 Volkswagen Corrado he owned in high school. Despite being tall enough to drive with his head out the sunroof, he always thought it fit him well. Nowadays, he gets his kicks dreaming about lifted Volvo 940 Turbos. --Instagram @calebjwords


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